In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb big sick

The Big Sick

Finds that laughter-through-tears sweet spot, often in the unlikeliest of places.

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Far Flunger Archives

Cast and Crew

* This filmography is not intended to be a comprehensive list of this artist’s work. Instead it reflects the films this person has been involved with that have been reviewed on this site.

Ebertfest 2017: "Hair" and "Being There"

Primary 671722018

Reviews and screenings of "Hair" and "Being There" at Ebertfest 2017, and Q&A with producers Michael Butler and Michael Hausman by Michael Phillips, Nate Kohn and Chaz Ebert; and with Oscar-nominated Caleb Deschanel by Simon Kilmurry and Scott Mantz.

Continue reading →

#284 September 6, 2016

Matt writes: In his captivating 2005 memoir, Kiss Me Like a Stranger, Gene Wilder reflected on his experience of making Mel Brooks' 1974 comic masterpiece, "Young Frankenstein." He likened making the picture to "taking a small breath of Heaven" each day, and that is what the film feels like every time I watch it. Wilder passed away on August 29th at age 83, leaving behind a timeless legacy that was celebrated at RogerEbert.com with Peter Sobczynski's beautiful obituary. Ebert himself gave four stars to several Wilder classics, including 1971's "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory," 1974's "Blazing Saddles" and of course, 1974's "Young Frankenstein," a film that earned Wilder an Oscar nomination for the screenplay he co-authored with director Mel Brooks. In his review, Roger wrote that the film "shows artistic growth and a more sure-handed control of the material by a director who once seemed willing to do literally anything for a laugh. It’s more confident and less breathless."

Continue reading →

One of the most disgusting horror films ever made

Some horror movies have mercy on uninformed audiences who have no idea about what they will get. The opening sequence of New Zealand horror film "Dead Alive" (1992), which is also known as "Braindead", is a good example because it kindly gives the audiences a very clear idea of what it about and how it is about. As the hero escapes from the natives of Skull Island (Southwest of Sumatra) with a mysterious creature dreaded by the natives, he accidentally gets bitten by the animal, hidden in a wooden crate. He says he's all right, but his local employees are suddenly frightened about that.

Continue reading →